Melitastitches4fun's Blog


Winter Scene Sleigh with Sky and Trees Stitched
January 17, 2019, 2:53 pm
Filed under: ANG Main Line Stitchers Chapter, Winter Scene Sleigh

A few of my ANG Main Line Stitchers Chapter members are stitching this Alice Peterson canvas, Winter Scene Sleigh. We’re using the painted canvas as a learning experience as we’ve been doing with other painted canvas. We discuss the differences between two stitch guides.

We all agreed that a non-directional stitch for the sky would be good. So, I went with Parisian. Even though the stitches are placed vertically on the canvas, it is non directional because of staggered placement. A couple of others are going to use alternating continental with 2 threads which will allow some canvas to show through.

The trees are stitched with Trio (T02-white) in Double Stitch which was a stitch recommended for tree trunks in Stitches For Effect by Suzanne Howren and Beth Robertson.

For the sky, I used Caron Waterlilies 74 Storm Clouds which is an overdyed thread with blue-green/grey portions. And, I used the greener area in the center and then reversed the direction of the threads in the outer areas to get a little more blue. Using 2 plies allowed the color of the canvas to show through a little. It’s subtle but I can see the difference.

I’ll have fun going through my stash looking for threads for the packages.

WinterSleigh-Melita

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Chainettes Explored

As part of an ongoing thread project for my ANG Main Line Stitchers Chapter, I researched the following chainette threads: 24 Karats, Alabaster, Cresta d Oro, Gold Rush, Nordic Gold, Snow, and Winter. A chainette is like a chain of crocheting. Because each chain is tucked into the one before it, it can unravel. I didn’t experience that while stitching with either Snow, Alabaster, or Winter. However, I was able to pull on all 5 chainettes that I had samples of and make them unravel. If you experience unraveling, there are several options: cut off the raveled part and rethread your needle; use a larger needle to open the hole and pull straight through the canvas to create less friction; use Fray Check; or, apply heat to the frayed end with a thread burner tool.

  • 24 Karats – Rainbow Gallery: A high luster chainette metallic thread (79% Metallized Polyester, 21% Nylon). It is recommended for use on 12 to 18 count canvas. Available in 13 colors on 10 yard cards.
  • Alabaster – Rainbow Gallery: An iridescent metallic chainette with an opalescent sparkle (58% Metallized Polyester, 42% Nylon). It is recommended for use on 13 to 18 count canvas. Available in white only on 20 yard cards.
  • Antica – Caron Collections: A chainette thread between a #3 and a #5 perle cotton with more of a soft glow than a shiny sparkle. Available in 9 antique shades on 20 yard cards.
  • Cresta d’Oro – Rainbow Gallery: A chainette (67% Viscose, 33% Metallized Polyester). It is recommended for use on 12 to 18 count canvas. Available in 23 different colors on 15 yard cards.
  • Gold Rush 12, 14, 18, or XS – Rainbow Gallery: A chainette (80% Viscose, 20% Metallized Polyester). Available in different colors in 3 sizes on 10 yard cards: 12 for use on 10 to 12 count, 14 for use on 13 to 16 count, 18 for use on 18 to 22 count. XS is very fine available in different colors on 20 yard cards.
  • Nordic Gold – Rainbow Gallery: A very fine metallic chainette (52% Metallized Polyester, 48% Nylon). About the size 2 or 3 strands of blending filaments. Available in different colors in 25 yard cards.
  • Snow – Caron Collections: A soft metallic chainette with an opalescent sparkle (58% Metallized Polyester, 42% Nylon). Available in different colors in 10 yard skeins.
  • Winter – Rainbow Gallery: An iridescent metallic chainette with an opalescent sparkle (66% Metallized Polyester, 34% Polyester). Available in white only on 10 or 40 yards per card.

These stitched samples are Snow (left), Alabaster (center), and Winter (right). All 3 threads are similar in size to a #5 perle cotton and worked well with good coverage on 18 count canvas.

Snow feels the softest, is the whitest, is the least iridescent, and looks the least like a chainette.

Alabaster has the most visible chainette effect even when stitched.

Winter covered the best, has a good blend of being white and iridescent, and doesn’t look like a chainette when stitched. It photographs best too! So, Winter will probably be what I use for the snow in the Winter Sleigh canvas that our ANG Main Line Stitchers Chapter are discussing and some of us are stitching.

Speaking of our chapter, I’m so excited that we have 5 new members since September! Oddly enough, each have arrived via a different path including being an invited guest to speak about her work on ecclesiastical needlepoint, a friend of a member, one met a member at Seminar, another heard of us through a local frame store, and the last through a Google search. And, that means 4 new ANG members as well!