Melitastitches4fun's Blog


Contemporary Embroidery Class
October 10, 2011, 3:17 pm
Filed under: Contemporary Embroidery Class, Needlework in Progress

I’ve signed up for another embroidery class on Saturday Oct 29! I read about the class and work by contemporary embroidery artist Erin Endicott on Nimble Needle’s blog at http://www.bloglovin.com/m/2169915/303297286/b/2169915/aHR0cCUzQSUyRiUyRnRoZW5pbWJsZW5lZWRsZS5ibG9nc3BvdC5jb20lMkYyMDExJTJGMTAlMkZjb250ZW1wb3JhcnktZW1icm9pZGVyeS1jbGFzcy5odG1s)

This workshop by contemporary embroidery artist Erin Endicott (http://www.erinendicottart.com/) will explore hand embroidery, hand dyeing, and hand sewing on the fabrics of your choice. We will work intuitively with pattern, line and mark making to create beautiful and powerful works of art. We are to bring our own “fabric something” that holds personal meaning. I have just brought vintage linens home from my mother’s house. So, this class will be great.
Also, this type of class could tie into what ANG is planning for a contemporary sampler competition in 2012 for Seminar in Philly:
“Samplers evoke thoughts of alphabets, rows (bands) of stitched designs and small distinct areas of designs, with traditional meaning. Samplers were originally identified, as a sample of each new stitch learned by the child on a single piece of fabric. However, in today’s world, many definitions of words are being redefined. Techniques are changing, available materials are changing, and as a result our lives, and our artistic endeavors, are changing. There will be a judged competition, for contemporary samplers. Members are encouraged to design, stitch, enter original samplers, and to compete, for cash and other awards. We wish to bring this beautiful art of the past and present into the future.”
Advertisements


Pilot Stitcher
October 8, 2011, 10:51 am
Filed under: ANG Pilot Stitcher, Needlework in Progress

I want to discuss the Pilot Stitching process for ANG correspondence classes.  This process is meant to ensure that the courses when offered to ANG members are error-free with clear instructions and accurate graphs/diagrams. This also helps determine their conformance to the level of proficiency definitions as set forth by ANG. If selected, everything about it is confidential and not for publication.

After I expressed interest, I was sent a “Pilot Stitcher Registration/Preference Form” but that is also available online (http://needlepoint.org/forms/Pilot-Preference-Form.pdf). On there you need to select your proficiency level: Basic, Basic-Intermediate, Intermediate, Advanced-Intermediate, Advanced based on the definitions for the student proficiency levels at http://needlepoint.org/corr_reg.php on the ANG website.

I was going to select Advanced Intermediate until I read the definitions. While I’ve done 5 workshops/classes & have no problem with diagonal patterns, I took a long, hard, honest look at the familiarity with “at least 4 techniques” for Intermediate and with a “wide variety of techniques” for Advanced Intermediate and the types of techniques listed for both. I also didn’t want to overestimate my ability and be placed on a project that I would struggle with and become frustrated. Also, time is limited to complete the task & the teacher needs constructive comments about the instructions. So, I determined I am more comfortable with being an Intermediate stitcher. 

I have done some work in the underlined techniques:

Intermediate: pulled thread, pattern darning, Florentine (Bargello), blackwork, free stitchery, beading, introductory silk and metal thread techniques, Hardanger, and mixed media

Advanced Intermediate: appliqué, attaching found objects, cut work, raised work, needlelace, needleweaving, silk and metal thread techniques, laying silk and stranded threads, and couching

Student Proficiency Levels:

The following description of levels is provided to assist each student in judging her/his level of expertise:

Basic

  • Can thread a needle, and begin and end threads correctly
  • Works tent stitch (half-cross, continental, and/or basketweave)
  • Can read and work from diagrams and charts

Basic Intermediate

  • Possesses skills outlined in previous level
  • Has participated in at least one (1) formal workshop or class or has had at least six hours of instruction in a class setting
  • Works diagonal tent stitch (basketweave) beginning at a corner of curved line and understands basic compensation
  • Can work at least six (6) different decorative stitches
  • Understands and works from stitch diagrams and charts with confidence

Intermediate

  • Possesses skills outlined in previous levels
  • Has participated in at least three (3) formal workshops or classes
  • Has stitched with a variety of threads such as cotton, wool, silk, synthetics, linen, metal and metallics, and is familiar with their characteristics
  • Confidently works complicated stitches from diagrams and is comfortable with their compensation
  • Has worked at least four different techniques on a readily counted grounds, such as pulled thread, pattern darning, Florentine (Bargello), blackwork, free stitchery, beading, introductory silk and metal thread techniques, Hardanger, and mixed media

Advanced Intermediate

  • Possesses skills outlined in previous levels
  • Has participated in at least five (5) formal workshops or classes
  • Has worked a wide variety of techniques on a readily counted ground, such as appliqué, attaching found objects, cut work, raised work, needlelace, needleweaving, silk and metal thread techniques, laying silk and stranded threads, and couching
  • Confidently stitches diagonal patterns

Advanced

  • Possesses skills outlined in previous levels
  • Has participated in a wide variety of formal workshops in different techniques and has experience with many different types of grounds and thread
  • Is interested in developing skills and pursuing solutions to problems in design, color, and techniques>
  • Is interested in developing original designs, colors, and/or styles

Then, I had to mark my needlework preferences that I would be willing to stitch (I have done some work in underlined items): Needlepoint, Geometric, Goldwork, Blackwork, Surface embroidery, Pulled Thread, Petit Point, Drawn Thread, Silk & Metallic, Japanese embroidery, Stumpwork, Laid thread, Couching, Beading, Florentine, Bargello, Hardanger, Ribbon embroidery, Assisi, Oriental openwork, Other. But, I only said I was willing to stitch  Needlepoint or Geometric because that would be my most proficient areas. 

Lastly, I had to mark what I would prefer to stitch on either Canvas: 18 ct Mono, Congress Cloth, 22 ct, 24 ct, and/or Linen: 18 ct, 20 ct, 22 ct, 24 ct, 26 ct, 28 ct, 30 ct, Silk Gauze, 25 ct, 32 ct, 40 ct, 48 ct, 56 ct. 

In additional comments, I indicated I would prefer to kit a project myself or use my stash although I would buy a kit if required.

I selected either Needlepoint or Geometric on 18 count Mono Canvas. As you can see, those are now quite specific abilities & preferences! My hats off to the folks who match people & courses – it must be quite a challenge!!



Embroidered flower missed the mark; so, taking 2nd class
October 7, 2011, 7:06 am
Filed under: Melita's Adaptations, Orchids, Photo Embroidery Class

Well, I missed the mark on the this project because I didn’t start with the right subject. And, I stitched in a classic embroidery style. So, I’m glad to get a second chance at an Oct 22 class at Rittenhouse Needlepoint.

Here’s the concept for the first class I took a few months ago with Joetta Maue – Glean from daily observation to create a one of a kind personal artwork by creating a visual “diary sampler” of embroidery stitches, incorporating abstraction and pattern or confessional writing and images. The “diary” of stitches will be explored as a daily act and observation. We will discuss the creative use of diaristic writing and daily life documentation, while looking at examples of contemporary fiber artists.

It was supposed to be more ‘Autobiographical Embroidery’. I don’t know what photo to take for the second class but I’m thinking about a photo from our wedding because we are celebrating 25 years of marriage next year! At least that is more in keeping with the concept.

I have stitched the orchid before (https://melitastitches4fun.wordpress.com/2010/03/08/orchids/ & it still looks nice enough: