Melitastitches4fun's Blog


Finished Scissor Sheath
January 31, 2011, 9:48 pm
Filed under: ANG Main Line Stitchers Chapter, Scissors Sheath Band Sampler

All done! It turned out nicely. The buttonhole stitch creates a wonderful edging. This did work up quickly but not as quickly as I expected. I had thought it was something we could stitch & finish at 2 of our 2-hour meetings. But, that’s not happening – which is fine! So glad I tested the waters.

And, I realize I didn’t read the instructions on finishing completely before I proceeded. The fabric lining was meant to extend out to the far edge of the scalloped sides so that they can be stitched into place when stitching the 2 sides together. Although with the bonding I used, even mine should be fine. If I hurriedly put the scissors into mine, over time, I’ll probably have issues. So, I’ll give the chapter members a bigger piece of lining.

Come join us at 7:15 pm on the 2nd Mon of each month just 30 minutes from Center City Philadelphia & 10 minutes from King of Prussia. Or contact us at: MainLineStitchersChapter@needlepoint.org for more information.

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Flower Side of Scissors Sheath
January 30, 2011, 12:16 am
Filed under: ANG Main Line Stitchers Chapter, Scissors Sheath Band Sampler

The scissors sheath is coming along nicely. This is the pattern as it appeared in Sampler & Antique Needlework magazine (Summer 2009) for Plimoth Scissors Sheath, except that I changed the date to 2011.

At AC Moore, I found Peel n Stick which are sheets of double-sided adhesive film. It cut to size, created an instant bond just by pressing, should add some support to the perforated paper, & will be easy to place in everyone’s kit. Then, I cut the lining which is Fabric Palette’s Craft Fabric in lime green that has a little glitter to it. You won’t be seeing the lining really but white seemed so boring & this looked spring-like to me. The last step will be to sew both sides together. Well, really, the last step will be putting kits together for everyone.

Neither I nor Main Line Stitchers have any financial interest in any of the companies mentioned.

Come join us at 7:15 pm on the 2nd Mon of each month just 30 minutes from Center City Philadelphia & 10 minutes from King of Prussia. Or contact us at:MainLineStitchersChapter@needlepoint.org for more information.



Scissors Sheath Band Sampler Side
January 26, 2011, 10:16 pm
Filed under: ANG Main Line Stitchers Chapter, Scissors Sheath Band Sampler

After I picked out my colors, I decided for the cost of DMC floss, I’d get 2 of the 4 colors I was missing! The green is just as good. It stitched up quickly. But, it took me longer than I could do in one 2-hour meeting. They should be able to finish both sides in a month. Then, at the 2nd meeting, we can glue backing onto each half & begin stitching the sides together.

Again, the stitches from the top band down are: Four-sided, Algerian-Eyelet, Diagonal Satin, Queen, Montenegrin, Cross for letters, Marking, Long & Short, Four-sided, & Surface Satin.

Next, you’ll see the back as diagrammed in the Sampler & Antique Needlework magazine (Summer 2009) for Plimoth Scissors Sheath. It is a pretty pattern too & I didn’t want the back & the front the same.

Come join us at 7:15 pm on the 2nd Mon of each month just 30 minutes from Center City Philadelphia & 10 minutes from King of Prussia. Or contact us at: MainLineStitchersChapter@needlepoint.org for more information.



Babies CK & CK
January 25, 2011, 5:19 pm
Filed under: Baby pieces

Just in case someone notices on FB that these are completed, SURPRISE! I didn’t forget about the boys.

To personalize the one, I asked my friend, Traci, to send me a picture of the menorah they light for holidays.

It ended up being a tad bigger than it seemed on paper. So, I made the stars smaller. And, the tree of life probably could have been bigger.



Scissors Sheath
January 20, 2011, 11:32 pm
Filed under: ANG Main Line Stitchers Chapter, Scissors Sheath Band Sampler

For our ANG Main Line Stitchers meeting in November, we gave each attending member a copy of Sampler & Antique Needlework magazine (Summer 2009) that I chose specifically because of the nice variety of items discussed. For one, there was a late 17th/early 18th century band sampler which discussed the European influence with the introduction of particular motifs and stitches.  And, there was a Plimoth Scissors Sheath pattern which I thought would be great for a small spring project using stitches identified in the 17th/18th century sampler.

The scissors sheath is made on 20-count Confection Perforated Sewing Cards from Tokens and Trifles. However, they were out of stock until at least February. But rather than wait & find myself in a difficult position of having to scramble with little time, I started contacting retailers identified on the Tokens & Trifles website as being retailers. Well, I ended up contacting 3 stores still in operation who had a few packages in stock. So, I’d like to thank Lavinia from Counted Embroidery in Califon, NJ, Sue from The Log House in New Castle, PA, and Judy from Judy’s Stitchery Nook in Harlingen, TX all of whom were generous to give a discount on the packages. In addition, Sue sent along patterns for other ornaments in case our chapter members would be interested in doing any of them. So nice!! I also want to mention that Nordic Needle, who was selling back issues of the magazine, referred us to the publisher, Hoffman Media LLC, because we wanted 20 copies & we got a 40% discount when we told them we were an ANG Chapter!

Neither I nor Main Line Stitchers have any financial interest in any of the companies mentioned except to thank those retailers that gave us a discount. We appreciate it!

So, I last night I used stitches diagrammed in the 17th/18th century sampler to design a banded scissors sheath! I hope the chapter members like it. But, they can stitch the design provided (mostly back stitching) or design their own if they prefer. The stitches from the top band down are: Four-sided, Algerian-Eyelet, Diagonal Satin, Queen, Montenegrin, Cross for letters, Marking, Long & Short, Four-sided, & Surface Satin. Tonight, I picked out my colors. Of all the DMC floss I have, I only had 2 of the 5 colors. I can’t get more stash for a small project like this. So, I found others that are just as good. I’ll stitch at least one side to show in our next newsletter.

Come join us at 7:15 pm on the 2nd Mon of each month just 30 minutes from Center City Philadelphia & 10 minutes from King of Prussia. Or contact us at: MainLineStitchersChapter@needlepoint.org for more information.



Project Gutenberg, Irish Stitch
January 12, 2011, 5:51 pm
Filed under: General comments, Project Gutenberg
I found the Irish Stitch diagram & discussed while wandering through books on Project Gutenberg (search term ‘needlework’ yielded 7 books) . The Irish Stitch was mentioned in relation to several items on display at Winterthur which looked like bargello but were actually done in Irish Stitch.
 
You can see the Irish Stitch diagram in: 

The Ladies’ Work-Table Book (from 1844)
Containing Clear and Practical Instructions in Plain and Fancy Needlework, Embroidery, Knitting, Netting and Crochet

 
Irish Stitch

Irish Stitch.—This is the production of an Irish lady of high rank. Bring your needle up No. 1 over four threads down 41, one stitch back two threads, up 22 down 62, up 43 (observe this is in a line with 41) down 83, up 64 (in a line with 62) down 104, up 102 down 62, up 81 down 41, continuing thus over the square. The spaces left between every other stitch must be filled up with half stitches; for instance, up 81 down 101, up 83 down 103. It is also some[67]times worked covering six and eight threads of the canvas at a time, coming back three or four threads, in the same proportion as the directions given. This stitch is proper for grounding, when the design is worked in tent or cross stitch; and the effect would be heightened by two strongly contrasted shades of the same color. It can be applied to a great variety of devices, diamonds and vandykes for example, and many others which will suggest themselves to the fair votaries of this delightful art. It looks pretty, and is easy of execution.

Note: The basket stitch they discuss is the same but horizontal:
Basket Stitch

Basket Stitch.—This is the same as Irish stitch, but the arrangement is different. Work three stitches over two threads; these are called short stitches; and then the long ones are formed by working three over six threads, the centre of which are the two on which the short stitches were worked. Thus you must continue the short and long stitches alternately, until you have finished the row. In the next, the long stitches must come under the short ones; and this diversity must be kept up until all the rows are completed. To finish the pattern, you have only to run a loose film of wool under the long stitches on each of the short ones, and the task is done.

Project Gutenberg is a wonderful resource!



Tips for Pieces of Eight
January 7, 2011, 10:14 pm
Filed under: Pieces of Eight

Here are tips you can hand out to your ANG chapter members. I compiled them for my fellow Main Line Stitchers & they found them useful. This covers Octagons A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, M & N.

Octagon A

  • Use a 30 inch thread to complete 1 unit or ½ of each heart (you really don’t want to stop in mid-unit).
  • Could lay overdyed threads so all 4 match or could switch placement to create less of a pattern.
  • Stitch 2 complete hearts that lie opposite each other rather than proceeding in a clockwise fashion (to work in more open holes).
  • Push threads in towards the heart in order to find holes 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13 & “come up outside” of previous stitches.

Octagon B

  • Use a 20 inch thread to make 1 full Rhodes Stitch.
  • Use two 75 inch or three 50 inch threads to make the Walneto (because 150 inches would be too cumbersome to work with).
  • For the Walneto, before going down into hole 10, pass the needle along the canvas under the threads from bottom to top. (If not, you’ll end up with a square like a Waffle Stitch that will cover up your Rhodes stitch and you’ll have to pull it out like I did!!) Also can refer to “The Needlepoint Book” by Jo Ippolito Christensen (1999, pages 267-269).

Octagon C

  • Use a 45 inch thread for beginning and ending the Waffle Stitch (stitches 1-22 and 47-62).
  • Use a 25 inch thread for middle portions (stitches 23-46).
  • Park needle and thread after stitching 1-22 until you are ready to complete stitches 47-62).

Octagon D

  • Use a 27-30 inch thread to complete each Rhodes. Place 3 separated threads together.

Octagon E

  • No tricky stitches as long as you pay attention.

Octagon F

  • Rotate the directions in order to place the main spratshead correctly.
  • Use a 12 inch thread for spokes of Woven Spider.

Octagon G

  • Use a 50 inch thread to complete all the crosses.
  • Work from the outside into the center of the eyelet.

Octagon H

  • The star uses a lot of thread (I didn’t measure)
  • Focus & pay attention to the schematic. Somehow, I was off but most wouldn’t notice & it wasn’t worth reworking.

Octagon I

  • 4 to 6 threads of floss cover more of the canvas (than the 3 I used).

Octagon M

  • Use 35″ thread to make the Waffle Variation.
  • There are 2 errors including the 31 near the top left should be a 36 and the 79 neat the top right should be a 77.

Octagon N

  • Nothing tricky here to making the Double Straight Cross
  • You do have to pay attention to how the pattern of the Alternating Cashmere turns (I had to unstitch a few times).

Good luck everyone!!

If anyone is in the area come join us at 7:15 pm on the 2nd Mon of each month just 30 minutes from Center City Philadelphia& 10 minutes from King of Prussia. Contact us at: MainLineStitchersChapter@needlepoint.org for more information.